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Three members of the Native American Women Warriors render honors during a vocal performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the National American Indian Heritage Month observance at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, Nov. 13, 2019. From left: Army veteran Keshon Smith; Marine Corps veteran Carrie Lewis; and Army veteran Mitchelene BigMan, president and founder of NAWW. The observance was organized by Huntsville Center’s Equal Employment Opportunity office in coordination with Team Redstone and the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command. The Native American Women Warriors are an all-female group of Native American veterans who started as a color guard but have since grown and branched out as advocates for Native American women veterans in areas such as health, education and employment. The members make appearances at various events around the country, serving as motivational and keynote speakers, performing tribal dances, and fulfilling the role of color guard representing all branches of the U.S. military.
191113-A-UT290-0015.JPG Photo By: Stephen Baack

Nov 15, 2019
REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. - Three members of the Native American Women Warriors render honors during a vocal performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the National American Indian Heritage Month observance at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, Nov. 13, 2019. From left: Army veteran Keshon Smith; Marine Corps veteran Carrie Lewis; and Army veteran Mitchelene BigMan, president and founder of NAWW. The observance was organized by Huntsville Center’s Equal Employment Opportunity office in coordination with Team Redstone and the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command. The Native American Women Warriors are an all-female group of Native American veterans who started as a color guard but have since grown and branched out as advocates for Native American women veterans in areas such as health, education and employment. The members make appearances at various events around the country, serving as motivational and keynote speakers, performing tribal dances, and fulfilling the role of color guard representing all branches of the U.S. military.


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